Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-5tm97 Total loading time: 0.202 Render date: 2021-08-05T06:12:38.854Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Too Much of a Good Thing? Brain Hyper Excitability and Migraine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2014

Werner J. Becker
Affiliation:
University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Prin Chitsantikul
Affiliation:
University of Calgary Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.
Type
Editorial
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2011

References

1Goadsby, PJ, Charbit, AR, Andreou, AP, Akerman, S, Holland, PR.Neurobiology of migraine. Neuroscience. 2009 Jun 30;161(2): 32741.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2Bolay, H, Moskowitz, MA.The emerging importance of cortical spreading depression in migraine headache. Rev Neurol (Paris). 2005 Jul;161(6-7):6557.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3Hadjikhani, N, Sanchez Del Rio, M, Wu, O, et al.Mechanisms of migraine aura revealed by functional MRI in human visual cortex. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2001 Apr 10;98(8):468792.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4van den Maagdenberg, AM, Pietrobon, D, Pizzorusso, T, et al.A Cacna1a knockin migraine mouse model with increased susceptibility to cortical spreading depression. Neuron. 2004 Mar 4;41(5):70110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5Coppola, G, Pierelli, F, Schoenen, J.Is the cerebral cortex hyperexcitable or hyperresponsive in migraine? Cephalalgia. 2007 Dec;27(12):142739.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6Lafrenière, RG, Cader, MZ, Poulin, JF, et al.A dominant-negative mutation in the TRESK potassium channel is linked to familial migraine with aura. Nat Med. 2010 Oct;16(10):115760.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7Noseda, R, Kainz, V, Jakubowski, M, et al.A neural mechanism for exacerbation of headache by light. Nat Neurosci. 2010 Feb;13 (2):23945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8Burstein, R, Yarnitsky, D, Goor-Aryeh, I, Ransil, BJ, Bajwa, ZH.An association between migraine and cutaneous allodynia. Ann Neurol. 2000 May;47(5):61424.3.0.CO;2-N>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9Burstein, R, Jakubowski, M, Garcia-Nicas, E, et al.Thalamic sensitization transforms localized pain into widespread allodynia. Ann Neurol. 2010 Jul;68(1):8191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10Cooke, L, Eliasziw, M, Becker, WJ.Cutaneous allodynia in transformed migraine patients. Headache. 2007 Apr;47(4):5319.Google ScholarPubMed
11Holland, P, Goadsby, PJ.The hypothalamic orexinergic system: pain and primary headaches. Headache. 2007 Jun;47(6):95162.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12Bartsch, T, Levy, MJ, Knight, YE, Goadsby, PJ.Inhibition of nociceptive dural input in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis by somatostatin receptor blockade in the posterior hypothalamus. Pain. 2005 Sep;117(1-2):309.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13Moulton, EA, Burstein, R, Tully, S, Hargreaves, R, Becerra, L, Borsook, D.Interictal dysfunction of a brainstem descending modulatory center in migraine patients. PLoS One. 2008;3(11): e3799.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
14Goadsby, PJ.Neurovascular headache and a midbrain vascular malformation: evidence for a role of the brainstem in chronic migraine. Cephalalgia. 2002 Mar;22(2):10711.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15Lai, KL, Liao, KK, Fuh, JL, Wang, SJ.Subcortical hyperexcitability in migraineurs: a high-frequency oscillation study. Can J Neurol Sci. 2011 Mar;38(2):30916.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16Bolay, H, Reuter, U, Dunn, AK, Huang, Z, Boas, DA, Moskowitz, MA.Intrinsic brain activity triggers trigeminal meningeal afferents in a migraine model. Nat Med. 2002 Feb;8(2):13642.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17Sanchez-Del-Rio, M, Reuter, U, Moskowitz, MA.New insights into migraine pathophysiology. Curr Opin Neurol. 2006 Jun;19(3):2948.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Too Much of a Good Thing? Brain Hyper Excitability and Migraine
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Too Much of a Good Thing? Brain Hyper Excitability and Migraine
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Too Much of a Good Thing? Brain Hyper Excitability and Migraine
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *