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P124: Canadian faculty experience of participating in a global health partnership working to build emergency medicine capacity in Ethiopia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 May 2019

A. Sithamparapillai*
Affiliation:
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
E. Fremes
Affiliation:
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
J. Maskalyk
Affiliation:
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
M. Landes
Affiliation:
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Abstract

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Introduction: Global health partnerships (GHPs) between high income and low income countries are a means of capacity building in education. Literature often focuses on the GHP structure and output, along with retention and experience of local trainees, but neglects the experience of involved faculty. Here, we survey Canadian teaching faculty participating in the Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration in Emergency Medicine (TAAAC-EM) to describe characteristics of participants and their experience in the program. Methods: EM faculty participating in TAAAC-EM teaching trips from 2011-2016 were invited to complete an online survey in February 2017. Teaching faculty travel for one month and undergo an extensive selection process, pre-departure training and post-trip debriefing. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using basic statistics and inductive thematic analyses respectively. Results: Overall, 19 (N = 30, 63.3%) faculty completed the survey, of which 13 had prior global health experiences (range 1 to > 12 months). On a scale of 1-7, participants rated their mean overall experience as a 5.9 and preparation as a 5.7. Among respondents, 79% would participate in future TAAAC-EM activities, 79% would engage in future global health endeavours, 95% said the experience improved their satisfaction of practicing clinical medicine and 89% said it improved their enjoyment of teaching medicine. However, while 58% stated they would recommend this experience without hesitation to colleagues, the remaining 42% said they would recommend this experience with caveats. This latter group had a lower rated preparedness (MD = 1.398, p = 0.003) and TAAAC-EM experience (MD = 1.545, p = 0.001). Major themes in qualitative responses included that the participants felt that intrinsic motivation and flexible predispositions were necessary to participate. Intrinsic motivation for global health involvement included appreciation and impact for GH, and personal growth. Regarding flexibility, respondents highlighted the importance of having a flexible demeanor to understand, accommodate and ethically address cultural differences and practicing in another context. Conclusion: The type of faculty to recruit for GHPs may require flexible predispositions and intrinsic motivation for GH. These qualities combined with adequate preparation can facilitate overall faculty experiences on global health trips.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2019 
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