Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-j7tnp Total loading time: 0.209 Render date: 2021-08-01T05:56:03.495Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

SUSPECTED TERRORISTS AND THE PRIVILEGE AGAINST SELF-INCRIMINATION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 July 2015

Get access

Extract

THE tension between the competing values of security and human rights in the fight against terrorism was the subject of the ECtHR (Fourth Section) decision of Ibrahim v Others v the United Kingdom (Application nos. 50541/08, 50571/08, 50573/08, and 40351/09), 16 December 2014. Two weeks after the London bombings of 7 July 2005, bombs were detonated on the London transport system but failed to explode. After the first three applicants were arrested on suspicion of detonating the bombs, they underwent “safety interviews” which are conducted urgently for the purpose of protecting life and preventing serious damage to property, without any solicitor present and before the suspect can seek legal advice, as authorized under the Terrorism Act 2000. At the start of the “safety interviews”, instead of the “old-style” caution which reminds the suspect of his right to silence and informs him that anything said may be given in evidence, the police wrongly issued the “new-style” caution, which reminds the suspect of his right to silence and informs him that the court can draw adverse inferences at trial from his silence. This was contrary to s. 34(2A) of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, which states that adverse inferences cannot be drawn at trial if the defendant did not have the opportunity to consult with a solicitor prior to questioning. During the “safety interviews”, the first three applicants denied any involvement in or knowledge of the detonation, but, at trial, they acknowledged their involvement in the detonation yet claimed that the bombs had been a hoax and were never intended to explode. The statements taken at their “safety interviews” were admitted at trial. The fourth applicant, Abdurahman, was initially interviewed by the police as a witness. When he started to incriminate himself by discussing the assistance he provided to one of the suspects, the police did not, at that stage, arrest him and inform him of his rights to silence and to legal inform as required under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Code of Practice C; they only did so after having further questioned him as a witness and having taken a written statement from him. His written statement was admitted at trial.

Type
Case and Comment
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge Law Journal and Contributors 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

SUSPECTED TERRORISTS AND THE PRIVILEGE AGAINST SELF-INCRIMINATION
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

SUSPECTED TERRORISTS AND THE PRIVILEGE AGAINST SELF-INCRIMINATION
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

SUSPECTED TERRORISTS AND THE PRIVILEGE AGAINST SELF-INCRIMINATION
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *