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Talismans and Trojan Horses: Guardian Statues in Ancient Greek Myth and Ritual

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 December 2008

Abstract

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Review Feature
Copyright
Copyright © The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research 1994

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