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AlepPBP2, but not AlepPBP3, may involve in the recognition of sex pheromones and maize volatiles in Athetis lepigone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2022

Hui-Hui Yang*
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Ji-Wei Xu
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Xiao-Qing Zhang
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Crop Diseases and Pests, Ministry of Education, College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
Jian-Rong Huang
Affiliation:
Henan Key Laboratory of Crop Pest Control, MOA's Regional Key Lab of Crop IPM in Southern Part of Northern China, Institute of Plant Protection, Henan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhengzhou, China
Lu-Lu Li
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Wei-Chen Yao
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Pan-Pan Zhao
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Dong Zhang
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Jia-Yi Liu
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China College of Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Youssef Dewer
Affiliation:
Phytotoxicity Research Department, Central Agricultural Pesticide Laboratory, Agricultural Research Center, 7 Nadi El-Seid Street, Dokki 12618, Giza, Egypt
Xiu-Yun Zhu
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Xiao-Ming Li
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
Ya-Nan Zhang
Affiliation:
Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Pollutant Sensitive Materials and Environmental Remediation, Anhui Provincial Engineering Laboratory for Efficient Utilization of Featured Resource Plants, College of Life Sciences, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, China
*
Author for correspondence: Ya-Nan Zhang, Email: ynzhang_insect@163.com; Xiu-Yun Zhu, Email: xyzhuhbnu@163.com; Xiao-Ming Li, Email: lixiaomingchnu@126.com

Abstract

Athetis lepigone Möschler (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) is a common maize pest in Europe and Asia. However, there is no long-term effective management strategy is available yet to suppress its population. Adults rely heavily on olfactory cues to locate their optimal host plants and oviposition sites. Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) are believed to be responsible for recognizing and transporting different odorant molecules to interact with receptor membrane proteins. In this study, the ligand-binding specificities of two AlepPBPs (AlepPBP2 and AlepPBP3) for sex pheromone components and host plant (maize) volatiles were measured by fluorescence ligand-binding assay. The results demonstrated that AlepPBP2 had a high affinity with two pheromones [(Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate, Ki = 1.11 ± 0.1 μM, (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate, Ki = 1.32 ± 0.15 μM] and ten plant volatiles, including (-)-limonene, α-pinene, myrcene, linalool, benzaldehyde, nonanal, 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 2-heptanone and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one. In contrast, we found that none of these chemicals could bind to AlepPBP3. Our results clearly show no significant differences in the functional characterization of the binding properties between AlepPBP2 and AlepPBP3 to sex pheromones and host plant volatiles. Furthermore, molecular docking was employed for further detail on some crucial amino acid residues involved in the ligand-binding of AlepPBP2. These findings will provide valuable information about the potential protein binding sites necessary for protein-ligand interactions which appear as attractive targets for the development of novel technologies and management strategies for insect pests.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

*

They contributed equally to this work.

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AlepPBP2, but not AlepPBP3, may involve in the recognition of sex pheromones and maize volatiles in Athetis lepigone
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AlepPBP2, but not AlepPBP3, may involve in the recognition of sex pheromones and maize volatiles in Athetis lepigone
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AlepPBP2, but not AlepPBP3, may involve in the recognition of sex pheromones and maize volatiles in Athetis lepigone
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