Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-6g96d Total loading time: 0.351 Render date: 2022-07-06T13:17:42.651Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Reply to ‘preconception paternal/maternal BMI and risk of small-/large-for-gestational age infant in over 4·7 million Chinese women aged 20–49 years: a population-based cohort study in China’

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 April 2022

Tonglei Guo
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Ying Yang
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Jiajing Jia
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Yuzhi Deng
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Yuanyuan Wang
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com
Ya Zhang
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com
Hongguang Zhang
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com
Yuan He
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Jun Zhao
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com
Zuoqi Peng
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com
Qiaomei Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Maternal and Child Health, National Health Commission of the PRC, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Haiping Shen
Affiliation:
Department of Maternal and Child Health, National Health Commission of the PRC, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Yiping Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Maternal and Child Health, National Health Commission of the PRC, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Donghai Yan
Affiliation:
Department of Maternal and Child Health, National Health Commission of the PRC, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Xu Ma
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Family Planning, Haidian District, Beijing100081, People’s Republic of China National Human Genetic Resource Center, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China email angela-yy65@hotmail.com Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Letter to the Editor
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

We thank Zhao and Xu for their valuable comments and recommendations on our study(Reference Guo, Yang and Jia1).

Firstly, we would like to note that both our study and Zhao’s study find that paternal body mass index (BMI) was associated with birth weight(Reference Guo, Yang and Jia1,Reference Xu, Zhao and Tan2) . We agree that a subgroup analysis by offspring sex is necessary to explore the sex-specific rule. We did subgroup analyses according to the infant’s sex in our first revised manuscript. However, we found that the results were similar in subgroup analyses according to the infant’s sex (online Supplementary Tables 1 and 2), and the associations between paternal preconception BMI levels and small-for-gestational age/large-for-gestational age in female/male infants were similar to the results in online Supplementary Table S4 in our previous study(Reference Guo, Yang and Jia1), respectively. Based on these results, we found no sex-dependent effect of paternal preconception BMI on large-for-gestational age/small-for-gestational age. According to comments of reviewers and space limitations, we deleted subgroup analyses results by the infant’s sex in our revised manuscript.

Secondly, information on the paternal history of chronic metabolic diseases was collected through face-to-face interviews by trained health staff in the National Free Pre-pregnancy Checkups Project (NFPCP)(Reference Zhang, Wang and Shen3). We also agree that paternal history of chronic metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes or hypertension) might have an impact on birth outcomes. The couples’ potential confounding variables which were significant in univariate analyses were subsequently adjusted in multivariate-adjusted multinomial logistic regression models. Paternal history of chronic metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes or hypertension) was not significant in univariate analyses, and we have tried to put these variables into the model for adjustment, but the results showed that there is no difference between adjusting these variables or not. Therefore, paternal history of chronic metabolic diseases was not included in the final models.

In conclusion, no sex-dependent effect of paternal preconception BMI on large-for-gestational age/small-for-gestational age was observed in our study. Both our study and Zhao’s study suggest that more efforts should be put on couples’ preconception health.

Acknowledgements

The authors thank health workers and countless participants throughout thirty-one provinces in the NFPCP for their considerable efforts and collaboration.

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (No. 2016YFC1000307), CAMS Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (No. 2018-I2M-1-004).

The corresponding author has full access to data in the study and takes responsibility for data integrity and the accuracy of data analysis. T. G. analysed the data and drafted the main manuscript text. J. J. and Y. D. searched the literature and interpreted the results. Q. W., H. S. and D. Y. led the data collection and laboratory testing. Y. Z., D. Y., Y. W., H. Z., Z. P., J. Z., Y. H. and Y. Z. collected the data. Y. Y. and X. M. revised the manuscript.

There are no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

For supplementary material/s referred to in this article, please visit https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114522001179

References

Guo, T, Yang, Y, Jia, J, et al. (2022) Preconception paternal/maternal body mass index and risk of small/large for gestational age infant in over 4·7 million Chinese women aged 20–49 years: a population-based cohort study in China. Br J Nutr, 128 (Epublication ahead of print version). https://doi.org/10.1017/S000711452200054X.Google ScholarPubMed
Xu, R, Zhao, W, Tan, T, et al. (2021) Paternal body mass index before conception associated with offspring’s birth weight in Chinese population: a prospective study. J Obstet Gynaecol, 1–6 (Epublication ahead of print version). https://doi.org/10.1080/01443615.2021.1945558.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhang, S, Wang, Q & Shen, H (2015) Design of the national free proception health examination project in China. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi 95, 162165.Google ScholarPubMed
Supplementary material: File

Guo et al. supplementary material

Tables S1-S2

Download Guo et al. supplementary material(File)
File 36 KB
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Reply to ‘preconception paternal/maternal BMI and risk of small-/large-for-gestational age infant in over 4·7 million Chinese women aged 20–49 years: a population-based cohort study in China’
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Reply to ‘preconception paternal/maternal BMI and risk of small-/large-for-gestational age infant in over 4·7 million Chinese women aged 20–49 years: a population-based cohort study in China’
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Reply to ‘preconception paternal/maternal BMI and risk of small-/large-for-gestational age infant in over 4·7 million Chinese women aged 20–49 years: a population-based cohort study in China’
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *