Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-t6r6x Total loading time: 1.31 Render date: 2022-07-05T13:03:04.595Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Metabolic effects of a mixed and a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet in man, measured over 24 h in a respiration chamber

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 July 2007

M. Hurni
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, University of Lausanne, 7 Rue de Bugnon, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
B. Burnand
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, University of Lausanne, 7 Rue de Bugnon, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
PH. Pittet
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, University of Lausanne, 7 Rue de Bugnon, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
E. Jequier
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, University of Lausanne, 7 Rue de Bugnon, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

1. The relation between dietary carbohydrate:lipid ratio and the fuel mixture oxidized during 24 h was investigated in eleven healthy volunteers (six females, and five males) in a respiration chamber. Values of the fuel mixture oxidized were estimated by continuous indirect calorimetry and urinary nitrogen measurements.

2. The subjects were first given a mixed diet for 7 d and spent the last 24 h of the 7 d period in a respiration chamber for continuous gas-exchange measurement. The fuels oxidized during 2·5 h of moderate exercise were also measured in the respiration chamber. After an interval of 2 weeks from the end of the mixed-diet period, the same subjects were given an isoenergetic high-carbohydrate low-fat diet for 7 d, and the same experimental regimen was repeated.

3. Dietary composition markedly influenced the fuel mixture oxidized during 24 h and this effect was still present 12 h after the last meal in the postabsorptive state. However, the diets had no influence on the substrates oxidized above resting levels during exercise. With both diets, the 24 h energy balance was slightly negative and the energy deficit was covered by lipid oxidation.

4. With the high-carbohydrate low-fat diet, the energy expenditure during sleep was found to be higher than that with the mixed diet.

5. It is concluded that: (a) the composition of the diet did not influence the fuel mixture utilized for moderate exercise, (b) the energy deficit calculated for a 24 h period was compensated by lipid oxidation irrespective of the carbohydrate content of the diet, (c) energy expenditure during sleep was found to be higher with the high-carbohydrate low-fat diet than with the mixed diet.

Type
Papers of direct relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1982

References

Acheson, K. J., Flatt, J. P. & Jéquier, E. (1979). Proc. 5th int. Mtg Endocr. Diabetes and Obesity. Marseilles, 06 1978.Google Scholar
Ahlborg, G., Felig, Ph., Hagenfeldt, L., Hendler, R. & Wahren, J. (1974). J. clin. Invest. 53, 1080.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armstrong, D. T., Steele, R., Altszuler, N., Dunn, A., Bishop, J. S. & DeBodo, C. (1961). Am. J. Physiol. 201, 9.Google Scholar
Astrand, P. O. & Rodhal, K. (1970). Textbook of Work Physiology, p. 453. Los Angeles: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Atwater, W. O. & Bryant, A. P. (1899). 12th A. Rep. Conn. (Storrs). Agric. Exp. Stat. p. 73.Google Scholar
Bergström, J., Hermansen, L., Hultman, E. & Saltin, B. (1967). Acta Physiol. scand. 71, 140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cahill, G. F. (1970). New Eng. J. Med. 282, 668.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Christensen, E. H. & Hansen, O. (1939). Skand. Arch. Physiol. 81, 160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Consolazio, C. F., Johnson, R. E. & Pecora, L. J. (1963). In Physiological Measurements of Metabolic Functions in Man, p. 315316 [Consolazio, C. F., Johnson, R. E. and Pecora, L. J., editors]. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Danforth, E. Jr, Burger, A. G., Goldman, R. F. & Sims, E. A. H. (1978). In Recent Advances in Obesity Research, vol. 2 p. 229 [Bray, G. A., editor]. London: Newman Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Dauncey, M. J. (1980). Br. J. Nutr. 43, 257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeHaven, J., Sherwin, R., Hendler, R. & Felig, Ph. (1980). New Engl. J. Med. 302, 477.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dole, V. P. & Meinertz, H. (1960). J. biol. Chem. 235, 2595.Google Scholar
Durnin, J. V. G. A. & Norgan, N. (1969). J. Physiol., Lond. 202, 106p.Google Scholar
Flatt, J. P. (1978). In Recent Advances in Obesity Research, vol. 2. Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress on Obesity, p. 211 [Bray, G. A., editor]. London: Newman Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Furnass, B. (1960). J. Physiol., Lond. 150, 11p.Google Scholar
Garrow, J. S. (1978). In Recent Advances in Obesity Research vol. 2. Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress on Obesity, p. 200 [Bray, G. A., editor]. London: Newman Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Hawk, P. B. (1947). Practical Physiological Chemistry, 12th ed., p. 814. Toronto: Blakiston.Google Scholar
Heindel, J. J., Cushman, S. W. & Jeanrenaud, B. (1974). Am. J. Physiol. 226, 16.Google Scholar
Herbert, V., Lan, K. S., Gottlieb, C. W. & Bleicher, S. J. (1965). J. clin. Endocr. Metab. 25, 1375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hermansen, L., Hultman, E. & Saltin, B. (1967). Acta Physiol. Scand. 71, 129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hildes, J. A., Sherlock, S. & Walshe, V. (1949). Clin. Sci. 7, 287.Google Scholar
Ho, R. J. (1970). Analyt. Biochem. 36, 105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hultman, E. & Nilsson, L. H. (1971). Adv. expl. Med. Biol. 11, 143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jéquier, E. (1980). Encycl. Med. Chir. Paris, Nutrition, 10371 A10, 11.Google Scholar
Landsberg, L. & Young, J. B. (1978). New Engl. J. Med. 298, 1295.Google Scholar
McLean, J. A. & Watts, P. R. (1976). J. Appl. Physiol. 40, 827.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (1959). Stat. Bull. 40, 40.Google Scholar
Nelson, R. A. (1978). In Recent Advances in Obesity Research, vol. 2 Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress on Obesity, p. 242 [Bray, G. A., editor]. London: Newman Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Passmore, R., Meiklejohn, A. P., Dewar, A. D. & Thow, R. K. (1955). Br. J. Nutr. 9, 20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Passmore, R. & Swindells, Y. E. (1963). Br. J. Nutr. 17, 331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pruett, E. D. R. (1970 a). J. appl. Physiol. 28, 199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pruett, E. D. R. (1970 b). J. appl. Physiol. 29, 809.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ravussin, E., Pahud, P., Doerner, A., Arnaud, M. & Jéquier, E. (1979). Pflügers Arch. 382, 197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Saltin, B. & Hermansen, L. (1967). In Nutrition and Physical Activity, p. 32 [Blix, G., editor]. Uppsala: Almquist & Wiksell.Google Scholar
Schutz, Y., Acheson, K. J., Ravussin, E. & Jéquier, E. (1981). Experientia, (Basel), 37.Google Scholar
Schutz, Y., Ravussin, E., Diethelm, R. & Jéquier, E. (1981). Int. J. Obesity. (In the Press).Google Scholar
Slein, M. W. (1965). In Methods of Enzymatic Analysis, 2nd ed., p. 117 [Bergmeyer, H. W. editor]. Weinheim: Verglag Chemie.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Souci, S. W., Fachmann, W. & Kraut, H. (1979). Die Zusammensetzung der Lebensmittel. Stuttgart: Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesselchaft MBH.Google Scholar
Wurtman, R. J. & Fernstrom, J. D. (1975). Am. J. clin. Nutr. 28, 638.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access
46
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Metabolic effects of a mixed and a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet in man, measured over 24 h in a respiration chamber
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Metabolic effects of a mixed and a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet in man, measured over 24 h in a respiration chamber
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Metabolic effects of a mixed and a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet in man, measured over 24 h in a respiration chamber
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *