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Lactic acid fermentation stimulated iron absorption by Caco-2 cells is associated with increased soluble iron content in carrot juice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2007

Sharon W. Bergqvist*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Box 5401, 402 29, Gothenburg, Sweden
Thomas Andlid
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Box 5401, 402 29, Gothenburg, Sweden
Ann-Sofie Sandberg
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Box 5401, 402 29, Gothenburg, Sweden
*
*Corresponding author: Dr S. W. Bergqvist, fax +46 31 833782, email sbt@chalmers.se
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Abstract

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An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model was applied to explore the impact of lactic acid (LA) fermentation by Lactobacillus pentosus FSC1 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FSC2 on the Fe bioavailability of carrot juice. The redox state of Fe in fermented carrot juice was also assessed as a crucial factor for absorption. LA fermentation was shown to improve mineral solubility to different extents at simulated physiological conditions: Mn (2-fold); Fe (1·5–1·7-fold); Zn (1·2-fold); Cu (1-fold). Soluble Fe2+ was increased about 16-fold by LA fermentation, and about one third of the Fe2+ remained soluble after in vitro digestion (about 4–5-fold higher than in fresh juice). Data on cell-line studies showed a 4-fold increase in the efficiency of Fe uptake, but not in transepithelial transfer by Caco2 cells, as a result of fermentation. The increases in Fe2+ level and the efficiency of cellular Fe uptake were strain-dependent. To sum up the effect on both Fe solubility and cellular uptake efficiency, the amount of cellularly absorbed Fe from Ln. mesenteroides FSC2-fermented juice was about 20 % higher than that from L. pentosus FSC1-fermented juice (22·7 v. 19·2 μg/l juice per mg protein). To conclude, LA fermentation enhanced Fe absorption by Caco-2 cells from carrot juice because of increases in not only Fe solubility after digestion, but also the efficiency of cellular Fe uptake. The fermentation-improved efficiency of Fe uptake was possibly due to the increased level of soluble Fe2+ rather than a being a strain-specific event.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2006

References

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