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The interaction between nutritional status and growth hormone in young cattle: differential responsiveness of fat and protein metabolism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Janet M. Dawson*
Affiliation:
School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK
Henry M. R. Greathead
Affiliation:
School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK
Jim Craigon
Affiliation:
School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK
David L. Hachey
Affiliation:
USDA Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
Peter J. Reeds
Affiliation:
USDA Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
Jennifer M. Pell
Affiliation:
Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge CB2 4AT, UK
Peter J. Buttery
Affiliation:
School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK
*
*Corresponding author:Dr Janet Dawson, fax +44 (0) 115 951 6122, email Janet.Dawson@nottingham.ac.uk
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Abstract

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The effect of dietary intake level on in vivo plasma leucine and plasma palmitate flux rates and on the response to a bolus injection of bovine growth hormone (GH) was investigated in six young steers. Animals were fed on a pelleted diet of dried grass–barley (0.7:0.3, w/w) in quantities sufficient to supply 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, 2.0, 2.4 or 2.65 × maintenance energy requirement, offered in hourly portions. Continuous intravenous infusions of [1-13C]leucine or [1-13C]palmi-tate were used to determine the flux of amino acid and fatty acid through the plasma pool before, immediately (1–3 h) after and 22–24 h after a subcutaneous injection of bovine GH (0.55 mg/kg body weight). Hourly blood samples were taken for 27 h to monitor the temporal responses of circulating hormones and metabolites following GH administration. The animal on the lowest plane of nutrition had elevated plasma GH and reduced insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations compared with those fed on higher intake levels. Plasma leucine flux and leucine concentration increased with intake while palmitate flux and plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were inversely related to intake. Leucine flux rate decreased in the animals fed on the two highest intake levels in response to GH 22–24 h after administration, but plasma leucine concentrations were reduced in all animals at this time. Only the animal fed on the lowest intake level showed an immediate response to GH (within 3 h of administration) with increased palmitate flux and plasma NEFA concentrations but a lipolytic response was apparent in other animals 22–24 h post-administration although the magnitude of the response was markedly reduced at high intakes. We conclude that lipid and protein metabolism are differentially responsive to GH and nutritional status.

Type
Animal Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1998

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