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Glucose metabolism in vivo in fed and 48 h starved goats during pregnacy and lactation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 July 2007

N. Chaiyabutr
Affiliation:
Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL, Scotland
Anne Faulkner
Affiliation:
Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL, Scotland
M. Peaker
Affiliation:
Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL, Scotland
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Abstract

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1. Glucose turnover (i.e. glucose entry and utilization rates) in fed and 48 h starved goats during pregnancy and lactation was determined using a continuous infusion of [U-14C]- and [3-3H]glucose.

2. Glucose synthesis and utilization increased during pregnancy and lactation in fed but not in starved goats.

3. Recycling of giucosc-C was approximately 10% in fed animals and 15–20% in starved animals and was unaffected by the stage of pregnancy or lactation.

4. Plasma glucose concentrations were maintained during pregnancy and lactation in fed goats but decreased during 48 h starvation in pregnant goats. Little change was seen in the plasma concentration of lipids and their metabolites during pregnancy and lactation in fed goats, but increases were observed after 48 h starvation.

5. The control of glucose metabolism in ruminants during pregnancy and lactation is discussed.

Type
Paper on General Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1982

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