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Food additives and food components in total diets in The Netherlands

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

W. Van Dokkum
Affiliation:
Division of Nutrition and Food Research TNO, CIVO Institutes, Zeist, The Netherlands
R. H. De Vos
Affiliation:
Division of Nutrition and Food Research TNO, CIVO Institutes, Zeist, The Netherlands
Frances A. Cloughley
Affiliation:
Division of Nutrition and Food Research TNO, CIVO Institutes, Zeist, The Netherlands
Karin F. A. M. Hulshof
Affiliation:
Division of Nutrition and Food Research TNO, CIVO Institutes, Zeist, The Netherlands
F. Dukel
Affiliation:
Division of Nutrition and Food Research TNO, CIVO Institutes, Zeist, The Netherlands
J. A. Wijsman
Affiliation:
Division of Nutrition and Food Research TNO, CIVO Institutes, Zeist, The Netherlands
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Abstract

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1. During a period of 2 years, every 2 months 126 different food items forming a 'market basket' were purchased, prepared and divided into twelve food commodity groups. The 'market basket' was based on a study of the dietary pattern of 16- to 18-year-old male adolescents. In the (homogenized) food groups various additives and components of nutritional importance were determined. From the concentrations of the additives and components in the food groups and the daily consumption of each food group, a mean daily intake of all components analysed was calculated.

2. The mean daily amounts of benzoic acid (34 mg), sorbic acid (6 mg), glutamic acid (66 mg) and sulphite (3 mg) were all far below the acceptable daily intake (ADI) value. Butylated hydroxytoluene and gallates were not detectabte, while bulylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) was found in only a few instances; the maximum amount of BHA was also very iow (4 mg).

3. The mean daily intakes of fluorine (0.8 mg), iodine (0.21 mg), phosphorus (1860 mg) and α-tocopherol (9.4 mg) seem safe and adequate. Cholesterol intakes of 25% above the maximum of 300 mg/d, as advised by the Dutch Bureau for Nutriiion Education, were found. The mean fat intake appeared to be 40% of total daily energy, protein content 13% of total energy and total (available) carbohydrate 46% of total energy. The daily dietary fibre content (18 g) and the daily amount of linoleic + Iinolenic acid (6% of total energy) were considered too low. The daily level of sodium (4.2 g) was not considered too high.

4. It is recommended that the study should be repeated regularly, e.g. every few years, in order to monitor trends in the concentrations of significant food components in total diets.

Type
Papers of direct reference to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1982

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