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Study of iodine transport and thyroid hormone levels in the human placenta under different iodine nutritional status

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 January 2024

Min Fu
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Zhiyuan Ren
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Yuanpeng Gao
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Haixia Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Wenxing Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Wanqi Zhang*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environment, Nutrition and Public Health, Center for International Collaborative Research on Environment, Nutrition and Public Health, Tianjin, 300070, People’s Republic of China
*
*Corresponding author: Wanqi Zhang, email wqzhang@tmu.edu.cn

Abstract

Iodine and thyroid hormones (TH) transport in the placenta are essential for fetal growth and development, but there is little research focus on the human placenta. The research aimed to investigate iodine and TH transport mechanisms in the human placenta. The placenta was collected from sixty healthy pregnant women. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC), serum iodine concentration (SIC), placenta iodine storage (PIS) and the concentration of serum and placenta TH were examined. Five pregnant women were selected as insufficient intake (II), adequate intake (AI) and above requirements intake (ARI) groups. Localisation/expression of placental sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and Pendrin were also studied. Results showed that PIS positively correlated with the UIC (R = 0·58, P < 0·001) and SIC (R = 0·55, P < 0·001), and PIS was higher in the ARI group than that in the AI group (P = 0·017). NIS in the ARI group was higher than that in the AI group on the maternal side of the placenta (P < 0·05). NIS in the II group was higher than that in the AI group on the fetal side (P < 0·05). In the II group, NIS on the fetal side was higher than on the maternal side (P < 0·05). Pendrin was higher in the II group than in the AI group on the maternal side (P < 0·05). Free triiodothyronine (r = 0·44, P = 0·0067) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (r = 0·75, P < 0·001) between maternal and fetal side is positively correlated. This study suggests that maternal iodine intake changes the expression of NIS and Pendrin, thereby affecting PIS. Serum TH levels were not correlated with placental TH levels.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work

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