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Intermittent fasting with a high-protein diet mitigated osteoarthritis symptoms by increasing lean body mass and reducing inflammation in osteoarthritic rats with Alzheimer’s disease-like dementia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2021

Sunmin Park*
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutrition, Obesity/Diabetes Research Center, Hoseo University, 165 Sechul-Ri, BaeBang-Yup, ChungNam-Do, 336-795Asan-Si, South Korea
*
*Corresponding author: Sunmin Park, email smpark@hoseo.edu

Abstract

Menopausal women are susceptible to osteoarthritis(OA) and memory impairment. We hypothesised that Alzheimer’s-like disease(AD) exacerbates OA and that intermittent fasting(IMF) with a high-protein(H-P) diet would enhance memory function and relieve OA symptoms in oestrogen-deficient animals induced AD and OA. The action mechanism was also explored. Ovariectomised Sprague–Dawley rats were fed high-fat(H-F) or H-P diets for 2 weeks, and then they had a hippocampal infusion of β-amyloid(25–35) for 4 weeks to induce AD and an injection of monoidoacetate(MIA) into the articular cartilage to induce OA. Non-AD groups had non-AD symptoms by hippocampal amyloid-β(35–25) infusion. IMF suppressed memory impairment in AD rats, especially those fed H-P diets. Compared with non-AD, AD exacerbated OA symptoms, including swelling, limping, slowed treadmill running speed, and uneven weight distribution in the left leg. The exacerbations were linked to increased inflammation and pain, but IMF and H-P lessened the exacerbation. Lean body mass(LBM) decreased with AD, but H-P protected against LBM loss. Histological examination of the knee joint revealed the degree of the cellular invasion into the middle zone, and the changes in the tidemark plateau were greatest in the AD-AL with H-F, while non-AD-IMF improved the cellular invasion to as much as non-AD-AL. H-P reduced the infiltration into the middle zone of the knee and promoted collagen production. In conclusion, AD exacerbated the articular cartilage deterioration and memory impairment, and IMF with H-P alleviated the memory impairment and osteoarthritic symptoms by decreasing hippocampal amyloid-β deposition and proinflammatory cytokine expressions and by increasing LBM.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Intermittent fasting with a high-protein diet mitigated osteoarthritis symptoms by increasing lean body mass and reducing inflammation in osteoarthritic rats with Alzheimer’s disease-like dementia
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