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Fat-free mass may play a dominant role in the association between systolic blood pressure and body composition in children and adolescents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 September 2023

Shikai Yu
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Song Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Jiamin Tang
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Yifan Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Chong Xu
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Moran Li
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Yawei Xu
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
Yi Zhang*
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People’s Republic of China
*
*Corresponding author: Dr Y. Zhang, email yizshcn@gmail.com

Abstract

Systolic blood pressure (SBP) is significantly associated with body composition in children and adolescents. However, which one of the components of body composition is the dominant contributor to SBP in children and adolescents remains unclear. We, therefore, aimed to determine the dominant contributor to SBP among components of body composition in a large cohort of American children and adolescents derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with cross-sectional analysis. In total, 13 618 children and adolescents (median age 13 years; 6107 girls) with available data on whole-body dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry measurements were included. Multiple linear regression showed that SBP was associated with higher total fat-free mass in boys (β = 0·49, P < 0·001) and girls (β = 0·47, P < 0·001) and with higher total fat mass only in boys (β = 0·12, P < 0·001) after adjustment for covariates. When taking fat distribution into consideration, SBP was associated with higher trunk fat mass (boys: β = 0·28, P < 0·001; girls: β = 0·15, P < 0·001) but negatively associated with leg fat mass (Boys: β = −0·14, P < 0·001; Girls: β = −0·11, P < 0·001), in both boys and girls. Dominance analysis showed that total fat-free mass was the dominant contributor to SBP (boys: 49 %; girls: 55·3 %), followed by trunk fat mass (boys: 32·1 %; girls: 26·9 %); leg fat mass contributed the least to SBP in boys (18·9 %) and girls (17·8 %). Our findings indicated that total fat-free mass was not only associated with SBP but also the most dominant contributor to SBP variation in American children and adolescents.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2023. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

Shikai Yu and Song Zhao contributed equally rather than all authors.

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