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Effects of dairy products, calcium and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of twenty-nine epidemiological studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 March 2020

Min-Qi Liao
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Xu-Ping Gao
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Peking University Sixth Hospital (Institute of Mental Health), National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders & Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), No. 51 Huayuan Bei Road, Beijing100191, People’s Republic of China
Xiao-Xuan Yu
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Yu-Fei Zeng
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shangrao Fifth People’s Hospital, Shangrao334000, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China
Shu-Na Li
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Nalen Naicker
Affiliation:
International School, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Tanya Joseph
Affiliation:
International School, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Wen-Ting Cao
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Statistics & Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Hainan Medical University, Haikou571199, People’s Republic of China
Yan-Hua Liu
Affiliation:
The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, No. 1 East Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Sui Zhu
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Qing-Shan Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Zhi-Cong Yang
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 1 Qi De Road, Guangzhou510440, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Fang-Fang Zeng
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Corresponding

Abstract

Findings for the roles of dairy products, Ca and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk remain controversial. We aimed to assess these associations by using an updated meta-analysis. Five electronic databases (e.g. PubMed and Embase) were searched from inception to 24 December 2019. Pooled relative risks (RR) with 95 % CI were calculated. A total of twenty-nine case–control or cohort studies were included. For comparisons of the highest v. lowest intakes, higher whole milk intake was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk (RR 1·35; 95 % CI 1·15, 1·59), whereas decreased risks were observed for higher intakes of low-fat milk (RR 0·84; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·96), dietary Ca (RR 0·71; 95 % CI 0·60, 0·84) and dietary vitamin D (RR 0·80; 95 % CI 0·67, 0·95). Additionally, for every 100 g/d increment, increased ovarian cancer risks were found for total dairy products (RR 1·03; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·04) and for whole milk (RR 1·07; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·11); however, decreased risks were found for 100 g/d increased intakes of low-fat milk (RR 0·95; 95 % CI 0·91, 0·99), cheese (RR 0·87; 95 % CI 0·76, 0·98), dietary Ca (RR 0·96; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·98), total Ca (RR 0·98; 95 % CI 0·97, 0·99), dietary vitamin D (RR 0·92; 95 % CI 0·87, 0·97) and increased levels of circulating vitamin D (RR 0·84; 95 % CI 0·72, 0·97). These results show that whole milk intake might contribute to a higher ovarian cancer risk, whereas low-fat milk, dietary Ca and dietary vitamin D might reduce the risk.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Authors 2020

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work.

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