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Dairy intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC Study) and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 October 2021

Ahmed Arafa
Affiliation:
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt
Ehab Salah Eshak
Affiliation:
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, El-Minia, Egypt
Jia-Yi Dong
Affiliation:
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
Kokoro Shirai
Affiliation:
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
Isao Muraki
Affiliation:
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
Hiroyasu Iso*
Affiliation:
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
Akiko Tamakoshi
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
*
*Corresponding author: Hiroyasu Iso, email iso@pbhel.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Dairy product intake was suggested to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancers. This study investigated the association between dairy product intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer (PAC) using a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. First, we included 59 774 people aged 40–79 years from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC Study). The Cox regression was used to compute the hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI of incident PAC for individuals who reported the highest intakes of milk, cheese and yogurt compared with not consuming the corresponding dairy products. Then, we combined our results with those from other four prospective cohort studies that were eligible after searching several databases, in a meta-analysis, using the fixed-effects model before evaluating publication bias and heterogeneity across studies. In the JACC Study, the highest v. no intakes of milk, cheese and yogurt were not associated with the reduced risk of PAC after a median follow-up of 13·4 years: HR (95 % CI) = 0·93 (0·64, 1·33), 0·91 (0·51, 1·62) and 0·68 (0·38, 1·21), respectively. The results did not significantly change in the meta-analysis: 0·95 (0·82, 1·11) for milk, 1·16 (0·87, 1·55) for cheese and 0·91 (0·79, 1·05) for yogurt. The meta-analysis showed no signs of publication bias or heterogeneity across studies. To conclude, consumption of milk, cheese and yogurt was not associated with the risk of PAC either in the JACC Study or the meta-analysis.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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