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Chinese visceral adiposity index, a novel indicator of visceral obesity for assessing the risk of incident hypertension in a prospective cohort study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2020

Minghui Han
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Ranran Qie
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Quanman Li
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Leilei Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Shengbing Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Xiaoyan Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Dongdong Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Cheng Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Yang Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Dechen Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Chunmei Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Qionggui Zhou
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Gang Tian
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Yanyan Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Yuying Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Yang Li
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Xingjin Yang
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Yang Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Yifei Feng
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Pei Qin
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Fulan Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Ming Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518000, People’s Republic of China
Dongsheng Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, People’s Republic of China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The present study aimed to investigate the association of the Chinese visceral adiposity index (CVAI) and its 6-year change with hypertension risk and compare the ability of CVAI and other obesity indices to predict hypertension based on the Rural Chinese Cohort Study. Study participants were randomly recruited by a cluster sampling procedure, and 10 304 participants ≥18 years were included. Modified Poisson regression was used to derive adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95 % CI. We identified 2072 hypertension cases during a median of 6·03 years of follow-up. The RR for the highest v. lowest CVAI quartile were 1·29 (95 % CI 1·05, 1·59) for men and 1·53 (95 % CI 1·22, 1·91) for women. Per-sd increase in CVAI was associated with hypertension for both men (RR 1·09, 95 % CI 1·02, 1·16) and women (RR 1·14, 95 % CI 1·06, 1·22). Also, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value for hypertension was higher for CVAI than the four other obesity indices for both sexes (all P < 0·05). Finally, per-sd increase in CVAI change was associated with hypertension for both men (RR 1·26, 95 % CI 1·16, 1·36) and women (RR 1·23, 95 % CI 1·15, 1·30). Similar results were observed in sensitivity analyses. CVAI and its 6-year change are positively associated with hypertension risk. CVAI has better performance in predicting hypertension than other visceral obesity indices for both sexes. The current findings suggest CVAI as a reliable and applicable predictor of hypertension in rural Chinese adults.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work.

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