Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-98q29 Total loading time: 0.197 Render date: 2022-06-28T11:43:22.603Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

A retrospective case-control service evaluation of CAARMS scores of patients with autism in York EIP, compared to age matched controls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Daniel Whitney*
Affiliation:
Tees Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust
Stephen Wright
Affiliation:
Tees Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust
*
*corresponding author.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Aims

Studies show the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Conditions in Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) populations is 3.6-3.7%, compared to approximately 1-1.5% in the general population. The CAARMS (Comprehensive Assessment of At Risk Mental States) is a national tool used by EIP services as a screening tool to bring patients into services and stratify their symptoms to determine what pathway may be most appropriate (First Episode Psychosis pathway (FEP) or At Risk Mental State pathway (ARMS)). As far as we are aware the CAARMS has not been validated in an autistic population. It is our view that several of the questions in the CAARMS may be interpreted differently by people with autism, thus affecting the scores. The aim of this evaluation was to identify whether CAARMS scores differ between patients diagnosed with autism and matched controls in York EIP.

Method

From their mental health records, we identified all patients in the service with a diagnosis of autism. We then compared the CAARMS scores, at the time of referral, to those of age matched controls (matched by being in the age range 16-30) without an autism diagnosis, using continuous sampling by date of referral.

Result

14 patients in the service had a diagnosis of autism and had completed a CAARMS. CAARMS domains are all scored between 0 and 6 (indicating increasing severity or frequency). Compared to the age matched controls, autistic patients had a higher mean difference in their scores for ‘Non-Bizarre Ideas’ (mean difference of 0.86 for severity and 0.57 for frequency) and ‘Disorganised Speech’ (mean difference of 0.28 for severity and 0.57 for frequency). These results did not reach statistical significance which was unsurprising given the sample size. The gender split between groups was similar.

Conclusion

Our evaluation suggests a difference in CAARMS scores between patients in our service with a diagnosis of autism and those without. A larger study would be needed to confirm a statistically significant difference and multicentre results would be needed as evidence of generalisability. However, if such a difference were confirmed it might question the validity of CAARMS in autistic patients or suggest that modifications, perhaps in the form of reasonable adjustments to the questions or scoring, were needed to increase the validity in this population. We would suggest that spending extra time checking the patient has understood the intended meaning of the questions in the CAARMS may increase validity, particularly in the ‘Non-Bizarre Ideas’ domain.

Type
Rapid-Fire Poster Presentations
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
You have Access Open access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A retrospective case-control service evaluation of CAARMS scores of patients with autism in York EIP, compared to age matched controls
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A retrospective case-control service evaluation of CAARMS scores of patients with autism in York EIP, compared to age matched controls
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A retrospective case-control service evaluation of CAARMS scores of patients with autism in York EIP, compared to age matched controls
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *