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Psychiatric intervention and repeated admission to emergency centres due to drug overdose

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Akiko Kanehara*
Affiliation:
Department of Youth Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Hayato Yamana
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Hideo Yasunaga
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Hiroki Matsui
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Shuntaro Ando
Affiliation:
Department of Health Policy and Informatics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Tsuyoshi Okamura
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
Yousuke Kumakura
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
Kiyohide Fushimi
Affiliation:
Department of Health Policy and Informatics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Kiyoto Kasai
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
*
Akiko Kanehara, Department of Youth Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. Email: a-kanehara@umin.ac.jp
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Abstract

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Background

Repeated drug overdose is a major risk factor for suicide. Data are lacking on the effect of psychiatric intervention on preventing repeated drug overdose.

Aims

To investigate whether psychiatric intervention was associated with reduced readmission to emergency centres due to drug overdose.

Method

Using a Japanese national in-patient database, we identified patients who were first admitted to emergency centres for drug overdose in 2010–2012. We used propensity score matching for patient and hospital factors to compare readmission rates between intervention (patients undergoing psychosocial assessment) and unexposed groups.

Results

Of 29 564 eligible patients, 13 035 underwent psychiatric intervention. In the propensity-matched 7938 pairs, 1304 patients were readmitted because of drug overdose. Readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in the unexposed group (7.3% v. 9.1% respectively, P<0.001).

Conclusions

Psychiatric intervention was associated with reduced readmission in patients who had taken a drug overdose.

Type
Research Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015

Footnotes

Declaration of interest

None.

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