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What is Motivational Interviewing?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2009

Stephen Rollnick
Affiliation:
University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff
William R. Miller
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico

Abstract

Motivational interviewing is a directive, client-centred counselling style for eliciting behaviour change by helping clients to explore and resolve ambivalence. It is most centrally defined not by technique but by its spirit as a facilitative style for interpersonal relationship. This article seeks to define motivational interviewing and to characterize its essential nature, differentiating it from other approaches with which it may be confused. A brief update is also provided regarding (1) evidence for its efficacy and (2) new problem areas and populations to which it is being applied.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 1995

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References

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