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Psychometric properties of Persian version of Cognitive Behavioural Avoidance Scale: results from student, general population and clinical samples in Iran

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2020

Reza Moloodi*
Affiliation:
Substance Abuse and Dependence Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keith Dobson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Ladan Fata
Affiliation:
Medical Education and Development Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Abbas Pourshahbaz
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Parvaneh Mohammadkhani
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Fereshteh Mootabi
Affiliation:
Family Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran
Maryam Kami
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Kaveh Ziai
Affiliation:
Private Practice, Tehran, Iran
Ata Ghaderi
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
*
*Corresponding author. Email: re.moloodi@uswr.ac.ir

Abstract

Background:

There is no published evidence about the psychometric properties of the Cognitive Behavioral Avoidance Scale (CBAS) in Eastern cultures.

Aims:

The current research evaluated the psychometric properties of a Persian version of the CBAS.

Method:

The research consisted of two studies. In Study 1, a university student sample (n = 702) completed the CBAS, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Thought Control Questionnaire and the Anxious Thoughts Inventory. In Study 2, a general population sample (n = 384) and a clinical sample (n = 152) completed the CBAS, the Young Compensation Inventory and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale-21.

Results:

Exploratory factor analysis of the data from Study 1 suggested a four-factor solution for CBAS. The CBAS had acceptable internal consistency and test–re-test reliability, and showed significant correlations with depression symptoms and anxious thoughts. Confirmatory factor analysis of the data from Study 2 indicated good fit between the four-factor model and data. The CBAS had a significant relationship with depression, anxiety and stress symptoms, but no associations with schema compensatory behaviour strategy. Finally, the CBAS and its subscales successfully distinguished a clinical sample from a general population sample.

Conclusions:

The findings provide preliminary evidence for reliability and validity of the CBAS among Iranian student, general population and clinical samples.

Type
Main
Copyright
© British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2020

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