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The effect of motivational interviewing on ambivalence in social anxiety disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 March 2021

Mia Romano
Affiliation:
Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
Lorna Peters
Affiliation:
Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

One reason that motivational interviewing (MI) is thought to translate well to a variety of treatment domains is due to the focus on client ambivalence.

Aims:

Therefore, the current study aimed to explore the construct of ambivalence in the context of MI and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD).

Method:

Participants were 147 individuals diagnosed with SAD who were randomised to receive either MI or supportive counselling prior to receiving group CBT for SAD.

Results:

The results suggested that MI was not related to decreases in general ambivalence or treatment ambivalence, although an indicator of treatment ambivalence was found to predict worse treatment outcome.

Conclusions:

The findings suggest that three sessions of MI prior to CBT may not decrease ambivalence in participants with SAD, which may underscore the potential importance of tackling ambivalence as it arises during CBT.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies.

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