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Developments in Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy for Persistent Psychotic Symptoms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2014

Gillian Haddock
Affiliation:
University Hospital of South Manchester
William Sellwood
Affiliation:
University Hospital of South Manchester
Nicholas Tarrier
Affiliation:
University Hospital of South Manchester
Lawrence Yusupoff
Affiliation:
University Hospital of South Manchester

Abstract

This paper is a review of studies on psychological treatments for positive psychotic symptoms, and a detailed description of two of these studies, the Manchester Symptom Project, which aimed to decrease positive symptoms by training patients in effective coping strategies, and the Liverpool Auditory Hallucination project, which aimed to provide a cognitive-behavioural treatment for individuals with persistent and distressing voices. The results from these studies indicate that enduring positive symptoms which have not responded to neuroleptic medication can be effectively treated by psychological methods.

Type
Special Issue: Behaviour Therapy and Schizophrenia — Part One
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 1994

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