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Wired but not WEIRD: The promise of the Internet in reaching more diverse samples

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2010

Samuel D. Gosling
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712. samg@mail.utexas.edu www.samgosling.com cjosandy@mail.utexas.edu www.carsonsandy.com
Carson J. Sandy
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712. samg@mail.utexas.edu www.samgosling.com cjosandy@mail.utexas.edu www.carsonsandy.com
Oliver P. John
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720. o_johnx5@berkeley.edu http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~johnlab/
Jeff Potter
Affiliation:
Atof Inc., Cambridge, MA 02139. research@outofservice.com http://research.outofservice.com/

Abstract

Can the Internet reach beyond the U. S. college samples predominant in social science research? A sample of 564,502 participants completed a personality questionnaire online. We found that 19% were not from advanced economies; 20% were from non-Western societies; 35% of the Western-society sample were not from the United States; and 66% of the U. S. sample were not in the 18–22 (college) age group.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

Göritz, A. S. (2010) Using lotteries, loyalty points, and other incentives to increase participant response and completion. In: Advanced methods for behavioral research on the Internet, ed. Gosling, S. D. & Johnson, J. A., pp. 219–33. American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Gosling, S. D. & Johnson, J. A., eds. (2010) Advanced methods for behavioral research on the Internet. American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Gosling, S. D., Vazire, S., Srivastava, S. & John, O. P. (2004) Should we trust Web-based studies? A comparative analysis of six preconceptions about Internet questionnaires. American Psychologist 59:93104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Johnson, J. A. (2010) Web-based self-report personality scales. In: Advanced methods for behavioral research on the Internet, ed. Gosling, S. D. & Johnson, J. A., pp. 149–66. American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Johnson, J. A. & Gosling, S. D. (2010) How to use this book. In: Advanced methods for behavioral research on the Internet, ed. Gosling, S. D. & Johnson, J. A., pp. 18. American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
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Reis, H. T. & Gosling, S. D. (2010) Social psychological methods outside the laboratory. In: Handbook of social psychology, vol. 1, 5th edition, ed. Fiske, S. T., Gilbert, D. T. & Lindzey, G., pp. 82114. Wiley.Google Scholar
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