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When theory trumps ideology: Lessons from evolutionary psychology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 September 2015

Joshua M. Tybur
Affiliation:
Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands. j.m.tybur@vu.nl http://www.joshtybur.com
Carlos David Navarrete
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824. cdn@msu.edu http://www.cdnresearch.net
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Evolutionary psychologists are personally liberal, just as social psychologists are. Yet their research has rarely been perceived as liberally biased – if anything, it has been erroneously perceived as motivated by conservative political agendas. Taking a closer look at evolutionary psychologists might offer the broader social psychology community guidance in neutralizing some of the biases Duarte et al. discuss.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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