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Suboptimality in perceptual decision making and beyond

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2019

Hilary C. Barth
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459. hbarth@wesleyan.eduapatalano@wesleyan.eduhttp://hbarth.faculty.wesleyan.eduhttp://apatalano.faculty.wesleyan.edu
Sara Cordes
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. cordess@bc.eduhttps://www2.bc.edu/sara-cordes/lab/
Andrea L. Patalano
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459. hbarth@wesleyan.eduapatalano@wesleyan.eduhttp://hbarth.faculty.wesleyan.eduhttp://apatalano.faculty.wesleyan.edu
Corresponding

Abstract

We concur with the authors’ overall approach and suggest that their analysis should be taken even further. First, the same points apply to areas beyond perceptual decision making. Second, the same points apply beyond issues of optimality versus suboptimality.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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