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Sex differences in mathematical reasoning ability among the intellectually talented: Further thoughts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2011

Camilla Persson Benbow
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011

Abstract

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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