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Revenge: Behavioral and emotional consequences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2012

Vladimir J. Konečni*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109. vkonecni@ucsd.eduhttp://psychology.ucsd.edu/people/profiles/vkonecni.html

Abstract

This commentary discusses dozens of ecologically powerful social-psychological experiments from the1960s and 1970s, which are highly relevant especially for predicting the consequences of revenge. McCullough et al. omitted this work – perhaps because of its misclassification as “catharsis” research. The findings are readily accommodated by Konečni's anger-aggression bidirectional-causation (AABC) model and can be usefully incorporated in an adaptationist view of revenge.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013

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References

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