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It's not WEIRD, it's WRONG: When Researchers Overlook uNderlying Genotypes, they will not detect universal processes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2010

Lowell Gaertner
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0900. gaertner@utk.edu
Constantine Sedikides
Affiliation:
Center for Research on Self and Identity, School of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, United Kingdom. cs2@soton.ac.uk
Huajian Cai
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China. huajian.cai@gmail.com
Jonathon D. Brown
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1525. jdb@uw.edu

Abstract

We dispute Henrich et al.'s analysis of cultural differences at the level of a narrow behavioral-expression for assessing a universalist argument. When Researchers Overlook uNderlying Genotypes (WRONG), they fail to detect universal processes that generate observed differences in expression. We reify this position with our own cross-cultural research on self-enhancement and self-esteem.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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It's not WEIRD, it's WRONG: When Researchers Overlook uNderlying Genotypes, they will not detect universal processes
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