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Explaining why experimental behavior varies across cultures: A missing step in “The weirdest people in the world?”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2010

Edouard Machery
Affiliation:
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260. machery@pitt.edu www.pitt.edu/~machery/

Abstract

In this commentary, I argue that to properly assess the significance of the cross-cultural findings reviewed by Henrich et al., one needs to understand better the causes of the variation in performance in experimental tasks across cultures.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

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Explaining why experimental behavior varies across cultures: A missing step in “The weirdest people in the world?”
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