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Evolution after mirror neurons: Tapping the shared manifold through secondary adaptation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2014

Matthew M. Gervais*
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, Center for Behavior, Evolution, and Culture, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095. mgervais@ucla.edu https://sites.google.com/site/matthewmgervais/

Abstract

Cook et al. laudably call for careful comparative research into the development of mirror neurons. However, they do so within an impoverished evolutionary framework that does not clearly distinguish ultimate and proximate causes and their reciprocal relations. As a result, they overlook evidence for the reliable develop of mirror neurons in biological and cultural traits evolved to work through them.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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Evolution after mirror neurons: Tapping the shared manifold through secondary adaptation
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