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Determinants of cognitive variability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2010

Sangeet S. Khemlani
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540. khemlani@princeton.edu http://www.princeton.edu/~khemlani
N. Y. Louis Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Educational Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR of China. louis@cuhk.edu.hk http://www.fed.cuhk.edu.hk/eps/people/leel.html
Monica Bucciarelli
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Po, 14–10123, Torino, Italy. monica@psych.unito.it http://www.psych.unito.it/csc/pers/bucciarelli/bucciarelli.html

Abstract

Henrich et al. address how culture leads to cognitive variability and recommend that researchers be critical about the samples they investigate. However, there are other sources of variability, such as individual strategies in reasoning and the content and context on which processes operate. Because strategy and content drive variability, those factors are of primary interest, while culture is merely incidental.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

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