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Beyond mechanism and constructivism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 June 2008

Boris Kotchoubey
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Tübingen, 72074 Tübingen, Germany. boris.kotchoubey@uni-tuebingen.de

Abstract

Neuroconstructivism is a hybrid of two incompatible philosophical traditions: a radical idealism insisting upon the free activity of the Subject; and a radical materialistic anthropomorphism, which ascribes inherent properties of humans (e.g., the ability to construct) to nonhuman objects or body parts (e.g., the brain). The two traditions can be combined only by obscuring or confusing the basic notions.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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References

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