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The Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics: An Interview with Bruce Perry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 November 2012

Laurie MacKinnon*
Affiliation:
Insite Therapy and Consulting, Lane Cove, NSW
*
Address for correspondence: laurie@insiteconsulting.com.au
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Abstract

In this interview with Bruce Perry, MD, PhD, Senior Fellow of The Child Trauma Academy, Laurie MacKinnon discusses with Dr Perry developmental trauma and the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics, an approach to clinical problem solving that utilises a developmental lens and incorporates advances in neurobiological development. Dr Perry gives his perspective on the causal connection between childhood abuse and later psychiatric diagnosis, the child's contact with a violent parent post-separation, the importance of interventions that address the organisation and functioning of lower parts of the brain and his perspective on the use and limitations of psychotropic medications, cognitive behaviour therapy and family therapy.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2012

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References

Dobson, C., & Perry, B. (2010). The role of healthy relational interactions in buffering the impact of childhood trauma. In Gil, E. (Ed.), Working with Children to Heal Interpersonal Trauma: The Power of Play (pp. 2643). New York, N.Y: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Perry, B. (2006). The Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics: Applying principles of neuroscience to clinical work with traumatized and maltreated children. In Boyd Webb, N. (Ed.), Working with Traumatized Youth in Child Welfare (pp. 2752). New York, N.Y: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Perry, B. (2009). Examining child maltreatment through a neurodevelopmental lens: clinical application of the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 14 (4), 240255. Retrieved from http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/15325020903004350&magic=crossrefCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perry, B., & Dobson, C. (2009). Surviving childhood trauma: the role of relationships in prevention of, and recovery from, trauma-related problems. Journal of CCYP, a division of British Association for Counseling and Psychotherapy, (March), 2831.Google Scholar
Perry, B., & Hambrick, E. (2008). The Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics. Reclaiming Children and Youth, 17 (3), 3843.Google Scholar
Perry, B., & Szalavitz, M. (2007). The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog: What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love and Healing. Philadelphia, PA: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Perry, B., & Szalavitz, M. (2010). Born for Love: Why Empathy is Essential — and Endangered. New York, N.Y: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Read, J., Perry, B., Moskowitz, B., & Connally, J. (2001). The contribution of early traumatic events to schizophrenia in some patients: a traumagenic neurodevelopmental model. Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes, 64 (4), 319345. Retrieved from http://www.atypon-link.com/GPI/doi/abs/10.1521/psyc.64.4.319.18602CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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