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Mitigating Intergenerational Trauma Within the Parent-Child Attachment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 August 2012

Jai Friend*
Affiliation:
CAMHS Hobart
*
Address for correspondence: jai.friend@dhhs.tas.gov.au
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Abstract

Nine-year-old Ben was said to hate women. His mother was terrified he'd ‘grow up a woman basher’. This paper describes the work done with Ben and his family at the Hobart Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. We drew predominantly on three therapeutic modalities: Theraplay, Family Attachment Narrative Therapy and Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy. Our work enabled Ben's mother to navigate the aftermath of her own trauma history in order to heal Ben's attachment trauma.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2012

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