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The Revised Transactional Model (RTM) of Occupational Stress and Coping: An Improved Process Approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 February 2012

Yong Wah Goh*
Affiliation:
The University of Southern Queensland, Australia. goh@usq.edu.au
Sukanlaya Sawang
Affiliation:
Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
Tian P.S. Oei
Affiliation:
The University of Queensland, Australia.
*
*address for correspondence: Dr Yong Wah Goh, University of Southern Queensland, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Sciences, Education City, PO Box 4196, Springfield QLD 4300, Australia.
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Abstract

Despite more than three decades of research, there is a limited understanding of the transactional process of appraisal, stress and coping. This has led to calls for more focused research on the entire process that underlies these variables. To date, there remains a paucity of such research. The present study examined Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) transactional model of stress and coping. One hundred and twenty nine Australian participants with full time employment (i.e., nurses and administration employees) were recruited. There were 49 male (age mean = 34, SD = 10.51) and 80 female (age mean = 36, SD = 10.31) participants. The analysis of three path models indicated that in addition to the original paths, which were found in Lazarus and Folkman's transactional model (primary appraisal→secondary appraisal→stress→coping), there were also direct links between primary appraisal and stress level time one and between stress level time one to stress level time two. This study has provided additional insights into the transactional process that will extend our understanding of how individuals appraise, cope and experience occupational stress.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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