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The role of phonological storage deficits in specific language impairment: A reconsideration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2006

Susan Ellis Weismer
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Jan Edwards
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison

Extract

In her Keynote Article, Gathercole (2006) presents a theoretical framework intended to account for evidence regarding the relation between nonword repetition and word learning. This framework stems from an impressive amount and breadth of research on this topic, including findings from adults and children with typical language abilities as well as language learning disorders. In this commentary we focus on claims relative to the interpretation of nonword repetition deficits in children with specific language impairment (SLI). One issue we address pertains to the nature of the proposed model of nonword processing and word learning, particularly with respect to phonological sensitivity and storage. The second issue we address relates to the assumption that a phonological storage deficit, although not sufficient, is necessary for SLI.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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