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Using Shuttle Radar Topography to map ancient water channels in Mesopotamia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Carrie Hritz
Affiliation:
1The Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, USA
T.J. Wilkinson
Affiliation:
2Department of Archaeology, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK (Email: Tony.Wilkinson@ed.ac.uk)

Extract

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is currently producing a digital elevation model of most of the world's surface. Here the authors assess its value in mapping and sequencing the network of water channels that provided the arterial system for Mesopotamia before the petrol engine.

Type
Method
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2006

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