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Sea ice changes inferred from methanesulphonic acid (MSA) variation in East Antarctic ice cores: are krill responsible?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 June 2005

SO KAWAGUCHI
Affiliation:
Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston, TAS 7050, Australia
NOBUE KASAMATSU
Affiliation:
The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 173-8515, 9-10 Kaga 1-chome, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, Japan
SHUICHI WATANABE
Affiliation:
Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 035-0022, 690 Kitasekine, Sekine, Mutsu, Japan
TSUNEO ODATE
Affiliation:
National Institute of Polar Research, 173-8515, 9-10 Kaga 1-chome, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, Japan
MITSUO FUKUCHI
Affiliation:
National Institute of Polar Research, 173-8515, 9-10 Kaga 1-chome, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, Japan
STEPHEN NICOL
Affiliation:
Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston, TAS 7050, Australia

Extract

Dimethyl sulphide (DMS) and its oxidation products (e.g. methanesulphonic acid, MSA) are known to play important roles in atmospheric chemistry (Liss et al. 1997). They act as source of atmospheric particles, and affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere directly by absorbing and scattering solar radiation or indirectly by forming cloud condensation nuclei, which enhance cloud albedo (Charlson et al. 1987, Curran & Jones 2000).

Type
Short Note
Copyright
© Antarctic Science Ltd 2005

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