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Dissolved Oxygen, NO and PO as tracers for Ross Sea Ice Shelf Water overflow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 September 2003

P. RIVARO
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Genova, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genoa, Italy
R. FRACHE
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Genova, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genoa, Italy
A. BERGAMASCO
Affiliation:
National Research Council, Institute for the Study of the Dynamics of Large Masses, 1364 S. Polo, 30125 Venice, Italy
R. HOHMANN
Affiliation:
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USA

Abstract

A mesoscale experiment was conducted in the Ross Sea near the shelf break in summer 1997–98 within the framework of the activities of the CLIMA Project of the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA), focus on study the shelf—slope interaction between the shelf waters and the CDW in correspondence of the Antarctic Slope Front. This paper deals with the dissolved oxygen distribution and with the application of conservative tracers NO and PO related to the physical variables, improving understanding of mixing processes study in correspondence of the shelf break. Experimental data showed the presence of both Ice Shelf Water overflowing the shelf and Circumpolar Deep Water intruding onto the shelf. Dissolved Oxygen (DO), NO and PO resulted useful as chemical tracers in outlining the mixing processes and bottom water formation spreading off continental shelf break of the Ross Sea, in which seems to be evidence that ISW plays an important role. In fact, a plume of ISW was observed flowing down the continental slope to the deep ocean. From chemical tracers we estimate its magnitude to be about 0.4 ± 0.2 Sv.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Antarctic Science Ltd 2003

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