Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-mzfmx Total loading time: 0.233 Render date: 2022-08-16T03:34:38.564Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Becoming a competent communicator: Communicative Competence and the Young School Learner

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2008

Extract

Language continues to play a central role in discussion about education and is still offered as a key to understanding educational success and failure. Its importance can be seen in the current publisher's catalogues, each with its offereings on language and education, in the many language courses and conferences attended by teachers, and in the recent government initiatives focusing attention on the requirments of language (specifically, English) teaching.

Type
Communicative Language Teaching
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Brown, R. 1973. A first language. Harmondsworth: Penguin.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruner, J. 1974. The relevance of education. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
Bruner, J. 1983. Child's talk: Learning to use language. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Clark, E. V. 1973. What's in a word? On the child's acquisition of semantics in his first language. In Moore, T. E. (ed.) Cognitive development and the acquistition of language. New York: Academic Press. 65110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cool-Gumperz, J. 1986. Caught in a web of words: Some consideration on language socialization and language acquisition. In Cook-Gumperz, J., Corsaro, W. A., and Streek, J. (eds.) Children's worlds and children's Language. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 3764.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cromer, R. F. 1979. The strength of the weak from the cognitive hypothesis for language acquisition. In lee, V. (ed.) Language development. London: Croom Helm.Google Scholar
Czerniewska, P. 1985a. How is language learned? Personality development and learning. London: Milton Keynes/Open University. [Course unit 12: E206.]Google Scholar
Czerniewska, P. 1985b. Language and school. Personality, development, and learning. London: Milton Keynes/Open University. [Course unit 24: E206.]Google Scholar
Czerniewska, P. 1987. Learning to literate. Communication and education. London: Milton Keynes/Open University. [Course unit 11: E207.]Google Scholar
Department of Education and Science. 1986. English from'5 to 16, Curriculum Matters 1. London: Her Majesty's Stationer's Office.Google Scholar
Department of Education and Science. 1987. The National Curriculum, consultative document. London: Her Majesty's stationer's Office.Google Scholar
Donaldson, M. 1978. Children's Minds. London: Fontana.Google Scholar
Edwards, D. and Mercer, N.. In Press. Common knowledge: The development of understanding in the classroom. London: Methuen.Google Scholar
Freeman, N. H., Shinha, C. G., and Stedom, J. A. 1982. All the cars--which cars: from word meaning to discourse analysis. In Beveridge, M. (ed.) Children thinking through language. London: Edward Arnold 52. 74.Google Scholar
French, P. and Woll, B. 1981. Context, meaning and strategy in parent-child conversation In Wills, G. (ed.) Learning through interaction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 157182.Google Scholar
Goodman, Y. 1986. Writing development in young children. Gnosis. 8. 814.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K. 1975. Learning how to mean. London: Edward Arnold.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heath, S. B. 1982. What no bedtime story means: Narrative skills at home and at school. Language in society 11. 4976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mercer, N., Edwards, D., and Maynin, J.. 1987. Putting context into oracy: the construction of shared knowledge through classroom discourse. Centre for Language and Communications occasional paper in communication No 5. Milton Keynes: Open University, School of Education.Google Scholar
Scribner, S. and Cole, M.. 1981. The psychology in literacy Cambridge, MA: Harward University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Temple, C., Nathan, R., and Burris, N.. 1982. The beginnings of writing. LondonAllyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
Walkerdine, V.. 1982. The interaction between size and family terms in home, school and experimental contexts. Final report to Social Sciences Research Council.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Becoming a competent communicator: Communicative Competence and the Young School Learner
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Becoming a competent communicator: Communicative Competence and the Young School Learner
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Becoming a competent communicator: Communicative Competence and the Young School Learner
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *