Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-dkqnh Total loading time: 0.16 Render date: 2021-10-20T02:20:06.609Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Lactation performance, herbage intake and lamb growth of Scottish Blackface and East Friesland × Scottish Blackface ewes grazing hill or improved pasture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

J. M. Doney
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PY
J. N. Peart
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PY
W. F. Smith
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PY
D. A. Sim
Affiliation:
Hill Farming Research Organisation, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PY
Get access

Abstract

Scottish Blackface (BF) and East Friesland × Scottish Blackface (EFX) ewes rearing single or twin lambs grazed for 14 weeks of lactation on two different pasture types in two consecutive years. Mean daily milk production, live-weight change and herbage intake of the ewes and live-weight gain of the lambs were measured each week.

In the first year the ewes grazed a ryegrass/clover sward. There were significant differences in milk production associated with breed of ewe and number of lambs reared. Peak yields, achieved in the 3rd or 4th week, reached 2·25, 2·5 and 3·25 kg/day for BF ewes with a single lamb and EFX ewes with single or twin lambs, respectively. Corresponding yields in the 14th week were 0·5, 1·35 and 1·15 kg/day. Live weight of ewes in all groups declined during the first 2 weeks but recovered by week 6. Herbage intake increased in all groups until the 8th week and then declined much more rapidly in the BF than in the EFX ewes. Lamb growth was related to milk intake to give weaning weights of 31·5, 39·0 and 29·0 kg, respectively.

In the second year, when ewes grazed a hill pasture dominated by an AgrostislFestuca community, differences in milk production, though significant, were smaller than in the previous year. Peak yields were 2·1, 2·25, 2·25 and 3·1 kg/day, respectively, for BF ewes with single or twin lambs and EFX ewes with single or twin lambs. At 14 weeks, yields had fallen to between 0·6 and 1·0 kg/day. The patterns of live-weight change and food intake were similar to those in the previous year. The EFX ewes consumed more food than BF ewes throughout lactation, particularly in the second half. Lamb growth rate was again related to milk supply and was lower than in the previous year. Weaning weights were 31·0, 25·5, 34·5 and 27·0 kg for single or twin lambs reared by BF or EFX ewes, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1983

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Arnold, G. W. and Dudzinski, M. L. 1967. Studies on the diet of the grazing animal. II. The effect of physiological status in ewes and pasture availability on herbage intake. Aust. J. agric. Res. 18: 349359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doney, J. M., Gunn, R. G., Peart, J. N. and Smith, W. F. 1981a. The effect of body condition and pasture type on herbage intake, performance during lactation and subsequent ovulation rate in Scottish Blackface ewes. Anim. Prod. 33: 241247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doney, J. M., Peart, J. N. and Smith, W. F. 1981b. The effect of interaction of ewe and lamb genotype on milk production of ewes and on growth of lambs to weaning. Anim. Prod. 33: 137142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doney, J. M., Peart, J. N., Smith, W. F. and Louda, F. 1979. A consideration of the techniques for estimation of milk yield by suckled sheep and a comparison of estimates obtained by two methods in relation to the effect of breed, level of production and stage of lactation. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 92: 123132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gibb, M. J. and Treacher, T. T. 1978. The effect of herbage allowance on herbage intake and performance of ewes and their twin lambs grazing perennial ryegrass. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 90: 139147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gibu, M. J., Treacher, T. T. and Shanmugalingam, V. S. 1981. Herbage intake and performance of grazing ewes and of their lambs when weaned at 6, 8, 10 or 14 weeks of age. Anim. Prod. 33: 223232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hunter, R. F. 1962. Hill sheep and their pasture: a study of sheep-grazing in south-east Scotland. J. Ecol. 50: 651680.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Langlands, J. P. 1975. Techniques for estimating nutrient intake and its utilisation by the grazing ruminant. In Digestion and Metabolism in the Ruminant (ed. Mcdonald, I. W. and Warner, A. C. I.), pp. 320332. University of New England Publishing Unit, Armidale.Google Scholar
Mccance, I. 1959. The determination of milk yield in the Merino ewe. Aust. J. agric. Res. 10: 839853.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maxwell, T. J., Doney, J. M., Milne, J. A., Peart, J. N., Russel, A. J. F., Sibbald, A. R. and Mcdonald, D. 1979. The effect of rearing type and prepartum nutrition on the intake and performance of lactating Greyface ewes at pasture. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 92: 165174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Milne, J. A., Maxwell, T. J. and Souter, W. 1981. Effect of supplementary feeding and herbage mass on the intake and performance of grazing ewes in early lactation. Anim. Prod. 32: 185195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peart, J. N. 1970. The influence of live weight and body condition on the subsequent milk production of Blackface ewes following a period of undernourishment in early lactation. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 75: 459469.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peart, J. N., Doney, J. M. and Smith, W. F. 1979. Lactation pattern in Scottish Blackface and East Friesland × Scottish Blackface crossbred ewes. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 92: 133138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peart, J. N., Edwards, R. A. and Donaldso, ELIZABETH. 1972. The yield and composition of the milk of Finnish Landrace × Blackface ewes. 1. Ewes and lambs maintained indoors. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 79: 303313.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Russel, A. J. F., Doney, J. M. and Gunn, R. G. 1969. Subjective assessment of body fat in live sheep. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 72: 451454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Lactation performance, herbage intake and lamb growth of Scottish Blackface and East Friesland × Scottish Blackface ewes grazing hill or improved pasture
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Lactation performance, herbage intake and lamb growth of Scottish Blackface and East Friesland × Scottish Blackface ewes grazing hill or improved pasture
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Lactation performance, herbage intake and lamb growth of Scottish Blackface and East Friesland × Scottish Blackface ewes grazing hill or improved pasture
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *