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Dating Paiute-Shoshoni Expansion in the Great Basin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Abstract

Corroboration of linguistic evidence for the northward expansion of Numic speakers from the southwestern Great Basin around A.D. 1000 is provided by the dating of Paiute-Shoshoni pottery. At eight stratified eastern Great Basin sites, this distinctive pottery is associated with Anasazi and/or Fremont ceramics, supporting the hypothesis that competition with Numic speaking groups was partially responsible for the disappearance of the Fremont culture.

Type
Reports
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for American Archaeology 1975

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