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Feature modeling using a grammar representation approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2005

E. OSTROSI
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Recherche Mécatronique 3M, Université de Technologie de Belfort-Montbéliard, Belfort, France
M. FERNEY
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Recherche Mécatronique 3M, Université de Technologie de Belfort-Montbéliard, Belfort, France

Abstract

In intelligent computer-aided design the concept of intelligence is related to that of integration. Using feature-based computer-aided design models is thought to make a complete integration. This paper presents a feature recognition approach based on the use of a feature grammar. Given the complexity of feature recognition in interactions, the basic idea of the approach is to find the latent and logical structure of features in interaction. The approach includes five main phases. The first phase, called regioning, identifies the potential zones for the birth of features. The second phase, called virtual extension, builds links and virtual faces. The third phase, called structuring, transforms the region into a structure compatible with the structure of the features represented by the feature grammar. The fourth phase, called Identification, identifies the features in these zones. The fifth phase, called modeling, represents the model by features. The feature modeling system software is developed based on this approach.

Type
Research Article
Information
AI EDAM , Volume 19 , Issue 4 , November 2005 , pp. 245 - 259
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

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