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Article contents

Exploratory movement and affordances in design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2015

Thomas A. Stoffregen*
Affiliation:
School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Bruno Mantel
Affiliation:
Normandie Université, France, and UniCaen, CesamS, F-14032 Caen, France
*
Reprint requests to: Thomas A. Stoffregen, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, 224A Cooke Hall, 1900 University Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55113, USA. E-mail: tas@umn.edu

Abstract

The design community has growing familiarity with the concept of affordances and with the utility of this concept in many areas of design. Less emphasis has been placed on natural processes by which people acquire knowledge about affordances. Consequently, little is known about how design might be optimized to enable users to detect the actions that are available in a given human–machine system. We review scientific research about what people do to obtain information about affordances. We discuss implications of this research for design.

Type
Special Issue Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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