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Wife's Labor Force Participation and Family Expenditures for Prepared Food, Food Prepared at Home, and Food Away from Home

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2016

Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics and Marketing, Rutgers University
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Abstract

This study examines the effects of a wife's participation in the labor force and other socioeconomic factors on family expenditures for prepared food, food prepared at home, and food away from home using the Bureau of Labor Statistics 1992 consumer expenditure survey. On the one hand, results indicate that the number of children, home ownership with mortgage, seasonality, region, wife's age, and income are important determinants of expenditures on food prepared at home. A wife's education and participation in the labor force, on the other hand, affect expenditures on prepared food and food away from home. The impact of both these factors is greater on food away from home than on prepared food expenditures.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association 

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