Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-jcldq Total loading time: 0.256 Render date: 2021-05-08T12:42:23.338Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Health Knowledge and Consumer Use of Nutritional Labels: The Issue Revisited

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2016

Sung-Yong Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University
Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University
Oral Capps Jr.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University
Get access

Abstract

The role of health knowledge in consumer use of nutritional labels on food packages is explored using data from the 1995 Diet and Health Knowledge Survey. Two types of label use models, a binary choice label use model and a level of label use model, are employed with particular attention given to the endogeneity of health knowledge. The binary choice model is concerned with factors affecting the probability of label use. The level of label use model deals with factors affecting the number of food products in which label use occurred. The results show that health knowledge has a significant role in increasing label use.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Becker, G.S. 1965. “A Theory of the Allocation of Time.Economic Journal 75: 493517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, A. and Trivedi, P. 1986. “Econometric Models Based on Count Data: Comparisons and Applications of Some Estimators and Tests.Journal of Applied Econometrics 1: 2953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caswell, J.A., and Mojduszka, E.M. 1996. “Using Informational Labeling to Influence the Market for Quality in Food Products.American Journal of Agricultural Economics 78: 1248–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Frazao, E. 1995. The American Diet: Health and Economic Consequences. USDA Information Bull. No. 711. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Washington DC.Google Scholar
Gawn, G., Innes, R., and Rausser, G. 1993. “Nutrient Demand and the Allocation of Time: Evidence from Guam.Applied Economics 25: 811–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gould, B.W., and Lin, H.C. 1994. “Nutrition Information and Household Dietary Fat Intake.Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics 19: 349–65.Google Scholar
Grogger, J. 1990. “A Simple Test for Exogeneity in Probit, Logit and Poisson Regression Models.Economics Letters 33: 329–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grossman, M. 1972. “On the Concept of Health Capital and Demand for Health,” Journal of Political Economy 80: 223–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guthrie, J., Fox, J., Cleveland, L., and Welsh, S. 1995. “Who Uses Nutrition Labeling and What Effects Does Label Use Have on Diet Quality?Journal of Nutrition Education 27: 153–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heckman, J.J. 1979. “Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error.Econometrica 47: 153–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ippolito, D.M., and Mathios, A.D. 1990. “Information, Advertising, and Health Choices: A Study of the Cereal Market.RAND Journal of Economics 21: 459–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenkel, D.S. 1990. “Consumer, Health Information and the Demand for Medical Care.Review of Economics and Statistics 72: 587–95.Google Scholar
Lisansky, Judith. 1991. “Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, and Schooling.Journal of Political Economy 83: 287305.Google Scholar
Kim, S., Nayga, R.M., Capps, O., and Tepper, B. 1999. “Consumer Label Use and Diet Quality: An Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis.” Invited Paper presented at the Food and Agricultural Marketing Consortium Conference on New Economic Approaches to Consumer Welfare and Nutrition, Alexandria, Virginia.Google Scholar
Kim, S., Nayga, R.M. Jr., and Capps, O. Jr. 2000. “The Effect of Food Label Use on Nutrient Intakes: An Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis.Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics 25(1): 215231.Google Scholar
Klopp, P., and McDonald, M. 1981. “Nutrition Labels: An Exploratory Study of Consumer Reasons for Nonuse.Journal of Consumer Affairs 15: 301–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Michael, R. 1972. Effect of Education on Efficiency in Consumption. Occasion Paper 116. National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
Murphy, K.M., and Topel, R.H. 1985. “Estimation and Inference in Two-Step Econometric Models.Journal of Business & Economic Statistics 3: 370–79.Google Scholar
Nayga, R.M. Jr. 1996. “Determinants of Consumers' Use of Nutritional Information on Food Packages.Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics 28: 303–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nayga, R.M. Jr. 1999. “On Consumers' Perception about the Reliability of Nutrient Content Claims on Food Labels.Journal of International Food and Agribusiness Marketing 11: 4355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nayga, R.M. Jr., Lipinski, D., and Savur, N. 1998. “Consumers' Use of Nutritional Labels While Food Shopping and At Home.The Journal of Consumer Affairs 32(1): 106120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nayga, R.M. Jr. 2000. “Nutrition Knowledge, Gender, and Food Label Use.The Journal of Consumer Affairs 34: 97112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pulter, D.S. and Frazao, E. 1994. “Consumer Awareness of Diet-Disease Relationship and Dietary Behavior: the Case of Dietary Fat.Journal of Agricultural Economic Research 45: 317.Google Scholar
Rivers, D. and Vuong, Q.H. 1988. “Limited Information Estimators and Exogeneity Tests for Simultaneous Probit Models.Journal of Econometrics 39: 347–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, J.B., and Spreng, R.A. 1996. “A Proposed Model of External Consumer Information Search.Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 24: 246–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sindelar, J.L. 1982. “Differential Use of Medical Care by Sex.Journal of Political Economy 90: 1003–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stigler, G.J. 1961. “The Economics of Information.Journal of Political Economy 69: 213–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Terza, J.V. 1998. “Estimating Count Data Models with Endogenous Switching: Sample Selection and Endogenous Treatment Effects.Journal of Econometrics 84: 129–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Variyam, J.N., Blaylock, J., and Smallwood, D. 1996. “A Probit Latent Variable Model of Nutrient Information and Dietary Fiber Intake.American Journal of Agricultural Economics 78: 628–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Food, U.S. and Administration, Drug. 1995. The New Food Label Publication No. BG. 95–12.Google Scholar
Wang, G., Fletcher, S.M., and Carley, D.H. 1995. “Consumer Utilization of Food Labeling as a Source of Nutrition Information.Journal of Consumer Affairs 29: 368–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Health Knowledge and Consumer Use of Nutritional Labels: The Issue Revisited
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Health Knowledge and Consumer Use of Nutritional Labels: The Issue Revisited
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Health Knowledge and Consumer Use of Nutritional Labels: The Issue Revisited
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *