Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-xbgml Total loading time: 0.399 Render date: 2022-08-14T18:02:02.609Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The Berlin Aging Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2008

Dale Dannefer
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Education and Human Development, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
Dennis Bromley
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool
Raymond Tallis
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Manchester
Gordon F. Streib
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology, University of Florida, Gainesville, U.S.A.
Paul B. Baltes
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education, Lentzeallee 94, D-14195, Berlin
Karl Ulrich Mayer
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education, Lentzeallee 94, D-14195, Berlin
Hanfried Helmchen
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education, Lentzeallee 94, D-14195, Berlin
Elisabeth Steinhagen-Thiessen
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education, Lentzeallee 94, D-14195, Berlin

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Review Symposium
Copyright
Copyright Cambridge University Press 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Dannefer, D. 1988. What's in a name? An account of the neglect of heterogeneity in studies of aging. In Birren, J. E. and Bengtson, V. L. (eds.), Emergent Theories of Aging. Springer, New York, pp. 356384.Google Scholar
Kohn, M. L. & Slomczynski, K. M. 1990. Social structure and self-direction: A comparison of the United States and Poland. Blackwell, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
Lachman, M. E. 1986. Personal control in later life: Stability change, and cognitive correlates. In Bakes, M. M. and Bakes, P. B. (eds.), The Psychology of Control and Aging. Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, pp. 207236.Google ScholarPubMed
Marmot, M. G., Smith, G. D., Stansfeld, S., Patel, C., North, F. and Head, J. 1991. Health inequalities among British civil servants: The Whitehall II study. The Lancet 337, 13871393.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McKinlay, J. B., McKinlay, S. J., Bambrilla, D. 1987. The relative contributions of endocrine changes and social circumstances to depression in mid-aged women. Journal of Health and Social Behaviour 28, 346363.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Riley, M. W., Riley, J. W. Jr., 1993. Individual and social potentials of older people. In Baltes, P. B. and Mittelstrass, J. (eds.), Zukunft des Alterns und gesellschaftliche Entwicklung. Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, pp. 425449.Google Scholar
Rowe, J. W. & Kahn, R. L. 1987. Human aging: Usual and successful. Science 237, 143149.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williams, D. R. 1990. Socioeconomic differentials in health: A review and redirection. Social Psychology Quarterly 53 (2), 8199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borneman, J. 1992. Belonging in the Two Berlins: Kin, Stale, Nation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bronté, L. 1993. The Longevity Factor. Harper Collins, New York.Google Scholar
Ragin, C. C. 1987. The Comparative Method: Moving Beyond Qualitative and Quantitative Strategies. University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
Ragin, C. C. and Becker, H. S. (eds.) 1992. What is a Case? Exploring the Foundation of Social Inquiry. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
Reichard, S., Livson, F. and Petersen, P. G. 1962. Aging and Personality. John Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
Riley, M. W. (ed.) 1988. Social Structure and Human Lives. Vol. 1 Social Change and the Life Course. Sage, Newbury Park, California.Google Scholar
Riley, M. W. (ed.) 1988. Sociological Lives. Vol. 2 Social Change and the Life Course. Sage, Newbury Park, California.Google Scholar
Baltes, M. M., Mayr, U., Borchelt, M., Maas, I. and Wilms, H.-U. 1993. Everyday competence in old and very old age: An inter-disciplinary perspective. Ageing and Society, 13, 657680.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baltes, P. B. 1968. Longitudinal and cross-sectional sequences in the study of age and generation effects. Human Development, II, 145171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baltes, P. B. 1993. The ageing mind: Potential and limits. Gerontologist, 33, 580594.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baltes, P. B. and Baltes, M. M. 1992. Gerontologie: Begriff, Herausforderung und Brennpunkte. In Baltes, P. B. and Mittelstraß, J. (eds.), Zukunft des Alterns und gesellschaftliche Entwicklung (pp. 134). de Gruyter, Berlin.Google Scholar
Baltes, P. B., Mayer, K. U., Helmchen, H. and Steinhagen-Thiessen, E. 1993. The Berlin Aging Study (BASE): Overview and design. Ageing and Society, 13, 483515.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baltes, P. B., Reese, H. W. and Nesselroade, J. R. 1988. Life-span Developmental Psychology: Introduction to Research Methods. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ.Google Scholar
Birren, J. E. (ed.). 1959. Handbook of Aging and the Individual: Psychological and Biological Aspects. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
Blossfeld, H.-P., Hamerle, A. and Mayer, K. U. 1989. Event-history Analysis: Statistical Theory and Application. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ.Google Scholar
Blossfeld, H.-P., Hamerle, A. and Mayer, K. U. 1991. Event-history models in social mobility research. In Magnusson, D., Berman, L. R., Rudinger, G. and Törrestad, B. (eds.), Problems and Methods in Longitudinal Research (pp. 212235). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dannefer, D. 1992. On the conceptualization of context in developmental discourse: Four meanings of context and their implications. In Featherman, D. L., Lerner, R. M. and Perlmutter, M. (eds.), (Vol. 11, pp. 84111). Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ.Google Scholar
Dieck, M. 1992. Besondere Perspektiven des Alterns und des Alters im vereinten Deutschland. In Baltes, P. B. and Mittelstraß, J. (eds.), Zukunft des Alterns und gesellschaftliche Entwicklung (pp. 640667). de Gruyter, Berlin.Google Scholar
Geiselmann, B. and Helmchen, H. 1994. Demented subjects' competence to consent to participate in field studies: The Berlin Aging Study (BASE). Medicine and Law, 13, 177184.Google Scholar
Helmchen, H. and Linden, M. 1993. The differentiation between depression and dementia in the very old. Ageing and Society, 13, 589617.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kohn, M. L. and Slomczynski, K. M. 1990. Social structure and self-direction: A comparative analysis of the United States and Poland. Basil Blackwell, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
Lang, F. R. and Carstensen, L. L. 1994. Close emotional relationships in late life: Further support for proactive aging in the social domain. Psychology and Aging, 2, 315324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Linden, M. 1993. Differences in adverse drug reactions in phase III and phase IV of the drug evaluation process. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 29, 5156.Google ScholarPubMed
Linden, M. 1994. Therapeutic standards in psychopharmacology and medical decision-making. Pharmacopsychiatry, 27, 4145.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Linden, M., Geiselmann, B. and Borchelt, M. 1992. Multimorbidität, Multimedikation und Medikamentenoptimierung bei alten Patienten. In Lungershausen, E. (ed.), Demenz: Herausforderung für Forschung, Medizin und Gesellschaft (S. 231240). Springer-Verlag, Berlin.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Linden, M. and Helmchen, H. 1994. World Health Organization Collaborative Study on Psychological Problems in General Health. Results from the Berlin Center. In Üstün, T. B. and Sartorius, N. (eds.), Mental Illness in General Health Care Across the World. An International Study. Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
Lindenberger, U. and Baltes, P. B. 1994. Sensory functioning and intelligence in old age: A powerful connection. Psychology and Aging, 9, 339355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindenberger, U., Gilberg, R., Little, T. and Baltes, P. B. (in press). Selektivität und Mortalität in der Berliner Altersstudie. In Mayer, K. U. and Baltes, P. B. (eds.), Die Berliner Altersstudie: Die vielen Gesichter des Alterns. Akademie Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
Mayer, K. U. and Baltes, P. B. (eds.). (in press). Die Berliner Altersstudie: Die vielen Gesichter des Alterns. Akademie Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
Mayer, K. U. and Tuma, N. B. (eds.). 1990. Event history analysis in life course research. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI.Google Scholar
Motel, A. and Wagner, A. 1993. Armut im Alter? Ergebnisse der Berliner Altersstudie zur Einkommenslage alter und sehr alter Menschen. Zeitschrift für Soziologie, 22, 433448.Google Scholar
Plomin, R., Pedersen, N. L., Lichtenstein, P. and McLearn, G. E. (in press). Variability and stability in cognitive abilities are largely genetic in later life. Behavior Genetics.Google Scholar
Riegel, K. F. and Riegel, R. M. 1972. Development, drop, and death. Developmental Psychology, 6, 306319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salthouse, T. A. 1991 Theoretical Perspectives on Cognitive Aging. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ.Google Scholar
Schaie, K. W. 1965. A general model for the study of developmental problems. Psychological Bulletin, 64, 92107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schütze, Y., Tesch-Römer, C. and Borchers, C. (in press). Jeder Mensch ist einzigartig: Sechs Lebensgeschichten aus der Berliner Altersstidie. In Mayer, K. U. and Baltes, P. B. (eds.), Die Berliner Altersstudie: Die vielen Gesichter des Alterns. Akademie Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
Smith, J. and Baltes, P. B. 1993. Differential psychological aging: Profiles of the old and very old. Ageing and Society, 13, 551587.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, J. and Baltes, P. B. (in press). Psychologisches Altern: Trends und Profile im hohen Alter. In Mayer, K. U. and Baltes, P. B. (Eds.), Die Berliner Altersstudie: Die vielen Gesichter des Alterns. Akademie Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
Steinhagen-Thiessen, E. and Borchelt, M. 1993. Health differences in advanced old age. Ageing and Society, 13, 619656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wernicke, T. F. and Linden, M. 1994. Clinical recognition and drug treatment of depression in cases found by standardized assessment. Pharmacopsychiatry, 37, 5457.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wernicke, T. F. and Reischies, F. M. 1994. Prevalence of dementia in old age: Clinical diagnoses in subjects aged 94 years and older. Neurology, 44, 250253.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wortman, C. B. and Silver, R. C. 1990. Successful mastery of bereavement and widowhood: A life-course perspective. In Baltes, P. B. and Baltes, M. M. (eds.), Successful aging: Perspectives from the Behavioral Sciences (pp. 225264). Cambridge University Press, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Berlin Aging Study
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Berlin Aging Study
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Berlin Aging Study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *