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Interview with Tunde Kelani

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 December 2020

Abstract

In this interview with the Nigerian filmmaker, Tunde Kelani, film scholar Tunde Onikoyi explores the universe of Kelani’s cinematic vision, particularly as it relates to Thunderbolt (2002) and Dazzling Mirage (2014). Although produced twelve years apart, what binds them is a common humanitarian narrative temperament. Onikoyi and Kelani discuss his films in broader terms, exploring literary references, Kelani’s interest in health, and how cinema convey his creative tendencies. The interlocutors investigate the effects of “magun,” male chauvinism, and patriarchal idiosyncrasies in contemporary Nigeria. Kelani shares his filmmaking vision, and reflects on the future of Nigerian cinema in framing African story-telling.

Résumé

Résumé

Dans cet entretien avec le cinéaste nigérian Tunde Kelani, Tunde Onikoyi explore l’univers de la vision cinématographique de Kelani, notamment en ce qui concerne Thunderbolt (2002) et Dazzling Mirage (2014). Bien que produit à douze ans d’intervalle, ce qui lie ces œuvres est un tempérament narratif humanitaire commun. Onikoyi et Kelani discutent de ses films en termes plus larges, explorant les références littéraires, l’intérêt de Kelani pour la santé et la façon dont le cinéma transmet ses tendances créatives. Les interlocuteurs étudient les effets du « magun », du chauvinisme masculin et des particularités patriarcales dans le Nigeria contemporain. Kelani partage sa vision cinématographique et spécule sur l’avenir du cinéma nigérian dans l’encadrement des récits africains.

Resumo

Resumo

Nesta entrevista ao realizador nigeriano Tunde Kelani, Tunde Onikoyi, estudioso académico de cinema, explora o universo cinemático de Kelani, em especial no que diz respeito a Thunderbolt (2002) e Dazzling Mirage (2014). Ainda que tenham sido produzidos com doze anos de intervalo, este dois filmes têm em comum uma atmosfera narrativa de caráter humanitário. Onikoyi e Kelani conversam sobre os seus filmes em termos abrangentes, explorando referências literárias, o interesse de Kelani por questões de saúde, e o modo como o cinema lhe permite transmitir as suas tendências criativas. Entrevistador e entrevistado analisam as consequências da prática antiadultério do “magun”, do machismo e das idiossincrasias patriarcais da Nigéria contemporânea. Além disso, Kelani dá a conhecer a sua visão sobre a realização cinematográfica e reflete sobre o futuro papel do cinema nigeriano na estruturação dos modos narrativos em África.

Type
Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the African Studies Association

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