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Consideration of structural constraints in passive rotor blade design for improved performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2016

J. W. Lim
Affiliation:
US Army Aviation Development Directorate – AFDD, Aviation & Missile Research, Development & Engineering Center, Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM), Ames Research Center, California, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This design study applied parameterisation to rotor blade for improved performance. In the design, parametric equations were used to represent blade planform changes over the existing rotor blade model. Design variables included blade twist, sweep, dihedral, and radial control point. Updates to the blade structural properties with changes in the design variables allowed accurate evaluation of performance objectives and realistic structural constraints – blade stability, steady moments (flap bending, chord bending, and torsion), and the high g manoeuvring pitch link loads. Performance improvement was demonstrated with multiple parametric designs. Using a parametric design with advanced aerofoils, the predicted power reduction was 1·0% in hover, 10·0% at μ = 0·30, and 17·0% at μ = 0·40 relative to the baseline UH-60A rotor, but these were obtained with a 35% increase in the steady chord bending moment at μ = 0·30 and a 20% increase in the half peak-to-peak pitch link load during the UH-60A UTTAS manoeuvre Low vibration was maintained for this design. More rigorous design efforts, such as chord tapering and/or structural redesign of the blade cross section, would enlarge the feasible design space and likely provide significant performance improvement.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 2015

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